About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 24
CSPAN2 7
KGO (ABC) 4
CNNW 3
MSNBCW 3
WRC (NBC) 3
WBAL (NBC) 2
CNBC 1
MSNBC 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
christmas in new york 73 unless you are manger square in bethlehem. >> clayton: we'll tell you about people stuck on the tarmac. five or six hours. if you were trapped or stuck in texas let us know. >> we have a folks news - fox news alert. former president bush's condition has worsened. he is 88 years old and he was formerally the president . he was hospitalized for a cough . and family spokesman admits things are not going well but doctors remain cautiously optmistic. >> he's in critical condition and in a bad way. the doctors believe there is a path for him to recover from this and if we can get him to rally a bit we will talk about a discharge date. >> he is alert and joking with the staff at methodist hospital. we'll have a live report from houston in the bottom of the hour. stay tuned for that . dozens of people singing "amazing grace" last night as they remember the two firefighters murded in webster, new york. ♪ i once was lost, but now i am found. >> the community coming together to honor these two men. they were shot and killed in an excon's christmas eve bash. we are hearing fr
against landmarks here in new york city. prosecutors say the suspect fully intended to carry out the attack, but he didn't have cash on hand. here's abc's andy field. >> reporter: in federal court, prosecutors described the 20-year-old as a suspected lone wolf terrorist inspired by al qaeda. he allegedly traveled to new york city on november 24 as part of a plot to detonate a bomb there. he had not identified a specific target, but those he considered were times square, wall street, city restaurants and theaters. after four days of reas reconnaissan reconnaissance, he returned to miami for additional planning. authorities discovered key bomb making components. according to prosecutors, all he lacked at the time was money. concern about the suspect reached the highest levels of government, with president obama among those briefed. adding to the drama, sources tell abc news, he slipped fbi surveillance to that trip to new york. sources say he had tried to contact overseas radicals, possibly connected to al qaeda. andy field, abc news, washington. >>> the army is beginning an invest
with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time with obama. the reason why i say it does a little bit, you have to have a conscience when you deal with anything. especially when you make decisions for other people than yourself, you have to have a conscience. w
airport. the rain moving on in. in new york city not expecting to see too much snowfall, maybe a coating, an inch or two into the afternoon hours and the evening. inland, the taoeupb yore portions of the northeast easily over a foot of snow. some place expect thing 18 inches. severe weather risk across parts of the indianas and the char line as. >> reporter: i just made it through laguardia last notice and that weather forecast is exactly why i came back. thank you. >> reporter: the united states is less than a week away from going over the so-called fiscal cliff. they say if president obama and congress don't make a deal we will almost certainly see a recession. do you buy that, steven? >> the congressional budget office is a nonpartisan group that does this and says we will in fact have an immediate rescission. they say that we come out of a short, sharp recession stronger than we would be if we didn't go into that recession in the first place. we stop borrowing money from the future to prop us up now. we have the immediate problems but in the long term we are in gets shape. that's wha
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
with the winds. but look at this, 12 inches, a foot plus of snow possible in western new york. the worst of it tonight until tomorrow in new york state. and then we will begin to see this move out. hefty total of snow. here is the movement as we head toward early tomorrow. you see new york, new york state ensconced in snow. western pennsylvania as well. then by thursday morning, it is still there, and into maine and finally pushes all out. so victor, we're not done with this here. we have another two days, good news all the severe threat coming to an end by tonight and snow still a factor with the winds. >> rough weather on the start of the christmas travel season. rough weather on the back end of it. >> that's right. >> hopefully people make it through. alexandra steele, thank you for that. >>> a lot of people had the families in newtown in their hearts and on their minds over the christmas holiday. there is now a plan to save the thousands of the items honoring the sandy hook school shooting victims. the flowers, the signs, the teddy bears and the tributes will become part of a sacred
and speak tonight on both sides of the aisle. and i also note that the gentlelady from new york and the gentleman from connecticut also wish to speak. mr. president, senators -- their states who have been very hard hit should have the opportunity to speak. i'm going to take my rebuttal of the coburn amendments and just abbreviate them. with the exception of being willing to accept the amendment where you can't get emergency assistance if you are a tax cheater or if you've passed away, with the exception of a funeral benefit i really object to the coburn amendment. my objections have been so well articulated by the gentleman from new york, mr. schumer; by the gentleman from new jersey, mr. menendez, i'm not going to preet them. i'm going to ask unanimous consent that my written rebuttals be in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: and in the interest of time, i think we're all agreed the very intent to save money by adding delay and bureaucracy will cost money and will cost time in terms of getting people back on their feet in both their home and in
. >> that's right. some of the decorations were provided by residents of long island, new york, who sent 26 christmas ornaments. >> i'm reading now online and twitter now that one way that people can kind of grieve and also honor the community and honor those victims is these random acts of kindness. i saw a friend who donated $260 to her favorite challenge. whatever you can do in the number of 26. so maybe that's a good way. if you're not there in connecticut to honor some of those victims. >> so many people feel connected to this story in many ways. >> how could you not? it is a tragically human story. so whatever any of us can do, we >>> this morning on "world news now," powerful punch. the holiday storm strong enough to unleash a mudslide to derail a train moves from west to east. >>> the heavy rainfall, the nasty snowfall and what all of that mess means to holiday travelers. it's wednesday, december 19th. >>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm sunny hostin in for paula faris. >> and i'm rob nelson. we'll show you the storm damage and also get the latest from
, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. if an agreement is not reached in time between senator harry reid and harry mcconne
, new york. >> can we pull off and take a snap? >> pull off tomorrow and take a snap. good advice. >> see you, everybody. we will be right back if we are awake. that really meets your needs a plan and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement plans endorsed by
tightly. a day of jitters. schools from new york to tennessee to texas all went on alert after fear ignited several false alarms, some bomb threats. others as minor as an umbrella mistaken for a gun. an elementary school in richfield, connecticut, just 20 miles from newtown, went into lockdown after someone reported a suspicious person. security on the minds of principal, it was a priority of sandy hook's own principal, killed in the mass shooting. we spoke with her best friend. safety was important to her. >> safety was her number one priority. she wanted school to be a safe haven. a place where students could come and feel comfortable, like it was their second home. >> reporter: from coast to coast, principals were re-evaluating security and taking extra measures to protect their students. in pittsburgh, security guards now have guns. in this california school, the day started with the mock lockdown drill. >> stay in lockdown mode until you hear an all-clear announcement. >> reporter: the other challenge for teachers and principals, what to say to students. >> we tell them that so
-old jack pinto. a little boy who loved sports, idolized the new york giants' victor cruz, who remembered pinto sunday. his father called the loss unimaginable, and said most of all, jack loved to play with his friends and keep up with his big brother. many of those friends attended the service. much too young to say goodbye. >> they were being comforted, and yet protected. a message of you're being secure now, because the worst is over. >> reporter: not far away, mourners remembered 6-year-old noah pozner, the little boy with a perpetual smile, described as a smart, funny child, who loved to eat tacos and loved animals. pozner's mother spoke at the service, calling noah her little man. noah's twin sister ariel survived the shooting in another classroom. near sandy hook elementary, messages of hope surround the ever growing memorial to the victims. as the town tries to cope, investigators are searching for answers. on monday, atf agents verified that nancy lanza and her son had visited local shooting ranges to practice firing weapons, though they hadn't done so in recent months. police sa
an hour, it's the winds. whether we see winds in washington or new york already slowing down travel tonight, they won't see the snow accumulation. it's the winds with this system that's a big deal. indy gusts to almost 40 miles per hour. roanoke, virginia to dchicago. we're talking a big geography in terms of the impacts of it. here's where the blizzard warnings are in. that's for 6 to 12 inches of snow coupled with winds at 40, 50 miles per hour making it difficult to see and visibility is down near zero. that's kind of the blizzard warning scenario. there's the blizzard warning. you can see that in areas of indiana and illinois and moving into ohio. these in the pink are winter weather warnings, so we'll see that. here's the snow. 12 inches at the very least, and in upstate new york, suzanne, we will see at least 12 inches of snow. so the timing in and around western new york, we see the snow tonight to tomorrow. i know you travel a lot, and it's those big cities in and around new york and new jersey and washington, big-time travel delays at the airports. already canceling hundred
office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell on the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it to? how did your research it? how do have to go? -- how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since there was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. th
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
in egypt, mohamed morsi is rescind iing h new law. >>> a new report says new york routinely ignored warning to prepare for a catastrophic hurricane. the warning started back in 1978 when a law was passed requiring the creation of a disaster plan. never happened. largely because of tight budgets or the lack of political drive to prepare for a storm many thought would never hit. it hit. >>> he said he always thought he'd be the next college baseball player. turned out the guy loves football. johnny manziel is the first freshman to win the heisman trophy. he took the top honors saturday night after a record-breaking debut including an upset victory against number one alabama back in november. >>> finally, santa's elves may have competition in japan. penguins at an aquarium have taken on the role of santa's little helpers. in the evening they have the special task of switching on the christmas lights, but before you get excited, by day, all they do is lounge around and do little to nothing so basically it's sort of their civic duty to do the whole lights thing. that is the news. back to erica a
early this morning. that bralanedwars acquired by the new york jets had a ham string. >> steve: joel is america's biggest jet's fan. >> gretchen: that is insider information. >> brian: he had a bounce in the step. >> gretchen: luckily i know who that is. should we kick off the show with headlines. we now know the identity of the shooter in the mall . he had no history of trouble but his ex-girlfriend said he quit his job in the derks li and sold all of his belongings and bought a ticket to hawaii. >> she wishes to express shock and grief the events in the shopping she has no explanation or understanding of her son's behavior. >> ros killed a 54 year old nurse and 45 year old father of two, steven forsyth. a 15 year old was seriously injured . robertson took his own life. late last night john fee -- macfee arrived in the united states. >> this morning i was in jail and today here i am. i am not worried at all. if i am in front of a court they will not send me back. they have no evidence . >> gretchen: macfee is wanted in the country of bealize for the murder of his neighbor. we'll hea
an e-mail, a facebook comment, or a tweet. let's look at the headlines from "the new york times." a similar headline this morning from "the washington post." maynard dropped the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. -- the john boehner drops the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. this from "the washington -- the wall street journal." the deadline looms with the fiscal cliff, that story available on line. joining us live, meredith who has been following this since it started. what happened to the caucus last night? caller: there is the surface answer, what happened when they were leaving the room. i think the most telling detail and what you have seen and the most outlets is that apparently when the speaker calls one of these meetings, it is so he can gen of the final votes and try to get enough votes to pass an initiative. that was not even the purpose of this particular session. he was calling them in to tell them they were not going to have the votes and to go home for christmas. that is a telling detail that apparently the speaker got in front of the room and said the serenity pra
of the country digs out from the last one. major cities from washington, d.c. to new york to boston in its path. >>> let's make a deal. president obama sitting down with top congressional leader from both parties in just hours. can they agree on something before sending the country over the fiscal cliff? >>> and holy cow. $8 for a gallon of milk? why that utterly ridiculous price could be a very real possibility today, friday, december 28th, 2012. >>> and good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm savannah guthrie. >> i'm willie geist in this morning. she is full of milk puns this morning. holy cow. utterly. >> what are you, lactose intolerant? >> the trifecta. >> we'll move on to the big story, which is the weather. we're bracing for another big storm before the last one is done. >> it's expected to bring a new round of travel headaches during a holiday travel weekend. how will it impact you in more on that ahead. >>> also, retired general norman schwarzkopf has died at the age of 78. he's being remembered as one of the greatest military figures in u.s. history. more o
confederate flags. "the new york times" reported in that meeting that a considerable section in the seats was devoted to denouncing the 1964 civil rights act. and any review that says that the only key issues in thurmond's career for constitutionalism and national security, i don't think can be taken, i don't think that passes the laugh test. of what we all know about strom thurmond and his career. so i was disappointed that "the wall street journal" felt that this man, let a close relationship with thurmond had been employed by thurmond, he admits that in the review, but then talks about that he was the best person to evaluate the book for the readers. i thought that was disappointing. >> he had no knowledge of what was being done at the time, that edwards, that was going to be, they didn't tell you ahead of time? >> no. >> that he was going to be the person? >> no. >> you have any other papers like the new times or anything -- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you can tell this is a big deal, based on the fury of big labor's reaction. edie in greenville, south carolina, democratic caller. is it eddie? i'm sorry. good morning. caller: good morning. i live in a work state and does not benefit the employer is at all. a company just moved into it charleston, boeing. they had the first test flight or three months ago on the 787. that was catastrophic. the wheel well caught on fire. other things did not work that were supposed to put out the fire instantly. it's not about quantity. it is quality. you need experienced union people. the unions have built this country and it will continue on , no matter what these guys try to do. >host: why would union workers be better qualified? caller: these people in charleston got to have the experience. i have seen many generations of different aircraft. y
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago, very liberal, seeing the rise of foreign born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. on abortion, the majority believe it should be legal compared to 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that's shifting. it is certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorat that's conservative when it comes to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away? you believe that those who vote exclusively for those -- are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to go against the cap date because of the position of life and marriage within the community. >> right. it's scary for me because it's a place we're not looking to the future. as a republicans, we're counting on the older ones, not how the changes. >> you'll be surprised. with the children of foreign born latinos, there's still much more conservative than the rest of the population. >> okay. we'll come back to this
and they will run the republicans out. host: here's a headline from the new york post. i want to read you a little bit on that subject from the new york times. that is from the new york times today. stephen from indiana is next on our independent line. good morning. caller: good morning. i will tell you, these breaks did not help when they started in. 2000 or in. how come is a point to hurt so bad when they removed them? we are talking $10 or $20 a week. everybody acts like it's thousands of dollars. so much money can help everybody out. itlet it expire. we have debts from the two wars and that's why we are in debt. that's my opinion. thank you. on twitter -- on wall street journal article. you can read more that in today's wall street journal. i want to bring in jim from franklin, tennessee, on the republican line. caller: thank you. i appreciate your taking my call today. i have been listening very closely to c-span for a long time. i particularly listen to what the democrats are saying, because i am always trying to figure out what they want. i boiled it down to four things. they want to tax mo
: another headline from "the new york times," "fiscal talks he up." boehner talks about where he will find allegiance within his party, the article also talks about where they will find support in the house from democrats. "no signs of reaching a deal revealed." as part of this so-called fix -- fiscal cliff, what tax deductions would you give up? fort lauderdale, hello. caller: hello. good morning. i feel that i would be willing to give up some of my medicare benefits. i currently get free shoes and other benefits from medicare that i would be willing to give up. host: anything that you would be willing to give up on your taxes? items that you have in the past? caller: i would be willing to give up my charitable deductions. host: how come? caller: i feel that i give part of it to my charitable deductions. host: would you still make donations to charity if you could not write it off on your taxes? caller: yes, i would. host: thank you for your call. joe? caller: i would be willing to give up earned income credit and i liked what the last caller said about modifying the amount for charitable
" -- mayor michael bloomberg of new york was on meet the press yesterday. here's his perspective on whether the congress and the president should act. [video clip] >> if you stop people who have psychiatric problems, who have criminal records, substance abuse problems, if you stop every one of them from buying a gun, i cannot promise this articular event would not have taken place, but this particular event is just one of a series that happens again and again. a big chunk of those would have [indiscernible]. it's like saying there's no reason to have speed limits. if congress were to act, if congress were not so afraid of the nra, if they were to stand up and do what's right for the american public, we would all be a lot better off. host: mayor michael bloomberg yesterday. our question for you is whether gun laws should change? the wall street journal as the deadline-- -- headline -- now allison from trenton on our independent line. caller: 1 question to be answered is whether or not anybody can put forth a good reason for people to have these guns. give me an example of a time when it has
, but it was reported previously that perhaps it was an altercation, again, and lieutenant paul vance, new yorking that down. as we learn more about the victims of this tragedy in midtown community is coming together to support each other as well. ♪ emotional vigils continued tonight and today. and president obama will travel to newtown to meet with the victim's families and peter, what can you tell us. >> kelly, i can tell you that around here, it's still, it's very hard for folks to deal with especially since yesterday we found out that 16 of the 26 victims inside sandy hook elementary school were born in 2006, another four born in 2005 and there have been memorials popping up. and the park we're sang there. a group of sandy hook elementary school students in the school when it was evacuated, in the firehouse, they were holding a yard sale selling their toys and their things, trying to raise money for the affected families, really for their classmates. there have been many more folks in this area, lit candles and hung posters or balloons and many, many more have attended vigils and a very touc
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
timesaver traffic. back to the news desk and andrea. >> thanks, liz. >>> demonstrators marched over new york city's brooklyn bridge last night. they want tighter gun laws in the country. several hundred people are said to have participated in the march. carrying candles, they stopped in the middle ever the bridge to read the names of the children and adults killed at sandy hook elementary school in connecticut. the school shooting has prompted renewed debate about gun control. legislators and the nra stood their ground on sunday morning talk shows. jessica doyle is here with the latest. good morning, jess. >> good morning to you, andrea. of course good morning to everybody at home. we definitely are seeing the drumbeat for tougher gun controls getting louder in the wake of course of newtown. we saw that on the sunday morning talk shows yesterday. among many other places in the wake of this tragedy, but advocates for tougher laws are running head first into gun rights lawmakers as well as the national rifle association. that's not stopping lawmakers like senator dianne feinstein of california
the "new york times," this is what they write where they stand in their progress right now. and there is a disagreement about stimulus funding and whether or not that is included in some overall deal. we will talk more about this from a democrat from pennsylvania coming up here on the "washington journal" later on the program. but i want to stick to our topic here this morning. role of federal state governments and mental health. we'll go to an independent caller from pennsylvania. caller, what's your name? caller: hello? host: hi. what's your name, caller? caller: yes. the role of the government in mental health, i believe, should be stepped up and i think it's directly related to the health care industry in particular. the obama care or whatever type of health program is needed because as someone said earlier, most people do not have enough financial weather withtoll be able to assist people that they know maybe in their family or in their neighbors or the communities to help them. and i'm amazed how when we hear about an event like this, people are amazed that so much vi
. no early voting in new jersey and new york, the states hardest hit so you had the week before, in other states you might have -- in north carolina significant number of the electorate already voted. so in both states ex-if if you cast a provisional ballot, it doesn't count at all. fortunately the state at the last minute had executive orders that opened that up. but how much education they were able get to out when people were just trying to unbury their lives and didn't have electricity and power. so allowing people who cast provisional ballots would have provided more flexibility, understanding ahead of time so people knew they could have gone to another precinct and voted and haste count. we want people to have their ballots counted but it wasn't able to get back to that location, so look at ways to expand the ability of people to vote and other options. expanding the way you vote permanently and looking how you inform people about the polling locations and ways -- text-messaging, or other -- that clearly broke down. >> for me, the problem with the electoral college. my job is to get
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago who are very liberal, but we're starting to see the rise of foreign-born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. i mean, just look at the pew numbers. on abortion still the majority believe that abortion should be legal compared to about 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that is shifting. it has certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorate that is very conservative when it comes to, to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away. we believe that those who vote exclusively for those issues are going to vote, are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to vote against the candidate because of their position of marriage within the latino community. >> right. it's scary to me because it is a place where we're not looking, again, we're not looking to the future. as a republican, we're counting on the older ones and not looking to how the vote is going to chang
americans, haitians, a big lgbt community, big arts community, a lot of internal migrants from new york, where the same way clark county has been -- you've got a pot, a core of white democratic activists that have brought california politics in nevada. ofmiami, you've got a core new york, northeastern democratic activists who brought those politics to south florida. and within that you're now starting to see very effective latino players, a democratic congressman who won a race against a highly flawed republican candidate, but still won, who formed a coalition that, you know, went from miami beach through working class neighborhoods, all the way down to the keys with very distinct different working class whites, gays, you know, snowbirders, and then a big chunk of cuban and non-cuban latinos. so, in the second part of it, you start thinking about identity politics in a different way. if you are thinking of a group that has flexed its muscles by virtue of being part of a coalition, as opposed to having flexed its muscles as being a plaintiff, as having been alone, as being outsiders sayi
hour new york city is probably worse these days but it's kind of good news. the new york area is the leader in new jobs. about 128,000 more people were working in the big apple compared to a year earlier. at the same time houston gained about 96,000 jobs. los angeles about 78,000. given its record energy production, north carolina has been named as the best-run stat. wyoming slips to second in this year's 24 sln 7 wall street.com rankings. nebraska is third. california wins the dubious distinction of the worst-run state just ahead of rhode island and illinois. >>> well, cold play dreams of paradise. but americans who seek it in hawaii have a steep price to pay. the rainbow state tops a new cold well banker list of the most expensive states for home buyers. the average listing for a four bedroom two bath home going for nearly $750,000. massachusetts is about $300,000 less but still the second most expensive state. california is the third priceyest with a $430,000 price tag on average. the most affordable listings, nebraska where the average listing is about $145,000. iowa and g
details on a gunman's deadly ambush in upstate new york, setting a fire and then shooting the first-responders. gregg: and talk about a holiday miracle. look at this. after a man makes it is mission to find a stranger's wedding ring lost on a snow-covered highway. how could you do that? >> i like to be able to get this back to him. and he can, return, pay it forward to someone else later in life. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, evertime. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpn pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as.. -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. patti ann: an investigation is now underway after a devastating plane crash in kazakhstan. the russian-built military jet went down yesterday near the border with uzbekistan, killing all 27 people on board. nighttime video f
, the "new york times" reporting today that boehner is enjoying the broadest support he has seen in two years but as you know, a lot of conservatives are very angry over his giving any ground on revenue. is the speaker's leadership still strong in your estimation? >> i think it is. and i know that it's a very tough position for our leader to be in. and especially tough when he cannot get the president to come to the table and in addition to that, we have the administration that keeps moving the goalpost. 2010 this very president said this is not the time when the economy is so bad to raise taxes on anyone yet now we're having him say he wants to raise taxes on small business own that's are going to affect about 700,000 jobs. is that really what we need to do in an economy where we have 23 million americans that are struggling for unemployment? this is the reason why we have to hold strong on this. the other this evening ng is we hear from the president on the other side of the coin. we have a spending problem in washington. unless we get serious about talking about that, we'll never solve thi
in new york. robert? >> caller: in september, sandstone gold was riding around 13, and you were extremely bullish on it. last month you reviewed it and gave it a bearish signal. with it riding near $11.50 now, how do you see it going in the future? >> what happened is my friend and super forensic accountant cautioned me, look, if gold does go down big, sandstorm may have more risk than the ceo felt it had. but at 11 now, this one's fine. i just prefer the gld, particularly after what happened with freeport the other day when they became freeport oil and gas with a gold and copper division. pam in indiana, pam? >> caller: thank you, mr. cramer. what do you think of abt, abbott laboratories? >> that's one of the largest positions for actionalertsplus.com. you see the co-research director stephanie link on "fast money" today, and i've got to tell you, maybe my favorite position after starbucks. let's go to kenny in illinois. kenny? >> caller: jimmy. >> yo, yo. >> caller: my question is about this private bancorp. >> don't know it well enough. let's do some work and we will come back, always
. . mr. murphy: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: mr. speaker, i have been to newtown, connecticut, and it's less than an hour's drive from my congressional district. we mourn all the people who lost their lives on friday, including 20 elementary school children and six educators. over the past few years, we have seen innocent lives lost to gun violence in a supermarket parking lot in arizona, a movie theater in colorado, an army base in texas, a college campus in virginia and now an elementary school in connecticut. the weapons have spawned these tragedies and long past time that we control them. the second amendment guarantees the right to bear arms but does not guarantee an absolute right to military-style, high caliber, semi-automatic, combat-assault rifles with high capacity magazines to anybody who wants them. it just does not and must not let interest groups persuade us otherwise. we need restrictions and sensible gun control legislation. we need them here and we need them now. our children are counti
until this sound and then the "lightning round" is over. are you ready skee-daddy? john in new york. >> caller: green point, brooklyn boo-yah to ya, jim. >> i'm going to see you with a carroll gardens boo-yah. what's going on? >> caller: what can you tell me about hess? >> here's the problem with hess. the problem with hess, it's the most undermanaged company in the world. it's split into two, and it's got great bakken assets, worth between $70 and $75, right now, maybe even more, but they haven't pulled the trigger. jim in florida, jim? >> caller: jesse james cramer, crazy horse from florida. i just started working the market about two years ago so i'm a newbie. i've made good 20% profits with ebay and century link. i'm looking to buy more, leaning towards about a 3 to 1 ratio on ebay, less on centurylink. give me your opinion jesse james. >> bingo, you're on, i would do the same. if it ain't broke, don't fix. you've got the right proportion and the right stocks and i bless it. jeff in florida, please, jeff? >> caller: hi, jim. hey, first-time caller, big fan of you and the show. >
was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white house, tuesday evening on c- span. >> george will spoke at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion in politics. the speech was hosted by the john danforth center on politics. we will hear from former senator john danforth, just before mr. will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he gr
-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com. >>> there she is, new york new york. the city that never sleeps. especially us. >> it is 5:23. we're minding your business this morning. u.s. stock futures pointing to a higher open for the markets. yesterday was a really strong day for stocks. >> and christine romans is here talking about that and also the gun maker companies down sharply. >> they were down big time. let me talk first about the overall market because it was a good day for your investments yesterday as long as you weren't invested in gun companies. naz tasdaq up 44. dow on track for one of the best years ever despite climbing a wall of worry about the fiscal cliff. so the feeling is they'll get that resolved. let me talk about the gun makers, though. let me show you a couple that are publicly traded companies hammered for three days in a row now. take a look, you've got smith & wesson shares down 19%, rugee do you know 15%. they have been up sharply over the past year. the fastest growing part of the gun market is high capacitythey the past year. the fastest growing part of the gu
new york, the bipartisan safer act, companion bill with the bipartisan bill in the senate by senator cornyn and senator bennett. the safer act does a lot of good things but basically it allows funding to go and -- so that we make sure we test these cases. it audits these backlogs so we know where these cases are that are sitting on the shelves. it does the audit. it brings funding and brings these cases to justice so that we can make sure that these victims of crime have their day in court as well. d.n.a. is a wonderful thing, and it's important that we make sure that evidence is available for law enforcement, for prosecutors and judges in the courtroom. she was a child, lavenia was a child when she was sexually assaulted. that was a long time ago, but there are 400,000 cases waiting to be tested. this is something we can do in a bipartisan way today to test those cases, to bring justice to the victims of crime and make sure those outlaws get their day in court as well and be held accountable for the rape of children in our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the sp
unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highest level of weeks allowed right now because of their differing unemployment rates. guest: it is administered by states. i think a lot of the state programs are too restrictive in their eligibility and have to look capps. there are some important steps forward in the american recovery act -- too low caps. there are some important steps forward and the american recovery act. i do not see a lot of prospects for much greater federal involvement any time soon. host: mableton, illinois on the line for independents. caller: i want to direct this to mr. tanner. i have never been in debt. i have a retirement, have a very nice pension from the state of california bar when i was a state police officer. -- for when i was a state police officer. we're not putting enough emphasis on what has happened in the last 10 years, seven trillion dollars t 6o de dollars trillion and we lost in pensions. --7 dollars trillion to $60 trillion that we lost in pensions. what would you do? how long do you think it should take to get out of this mess that th
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
dramatically as a matter of fact. why are prices going down and how far? abc's john schriffen is in new york city with some answers. john, good morning. >> reporter: dan, good morning. experts say one of the reasons prices are going down, because after issues earlier this year refineries are back up and running at normal capacity on the east and west coast. with plenty of gas to go around, we'll actually see prices keep falling. drivers can play a game of driver limbo. see how low these prices will go. this weekend, as drivers pull up to the pump and check out the price of gas, they're noticing a welcome trend. >> they're lowering it. it's amazing. >> reporter: just how great has it been? take a look. a month ago, the average was $3.50. last week, it dropped to $3.40. and now, it's down, again, nearly 14 cents from the average a month ago. >> aaa's prediction is that, by christmas, we should have prices between $3.20 and $3.40. >> i'm thrilled. i mean, i have to buy gas no matter what, the fact that it costs a little bit less with christmas coming up. >> reporter: so, what's causing the sudd
with a set of concrete proposals and new york governor andrew cuomo said thursday he'll push for a new package of gun safety legislation including conmiss skags or mandatory sale of residents' guns to the state. that idea sounds impractical, consider that that was already done in australia. after a mass shooting in that country killed 35 people in 1996, australia's national firearms' act effectively banned assault weapons. the guns were banned and the buy-back program was kpucompuls. they decide after the law took effect the gun homicide rate in that country dropped by 42%. you should also know that 11 gun massacres occurred in the decade before awe stral yee national firearms act and there have been zero mass shootings since, according to the study published in 2009. of course, can that kind of proven policy response is not your thing, there's those like wayne la pierre that have different ideas like packing public schools with armed security officers, a notion so far afield the neerk post, owned by the right-wing but pro gun safety, require perth murdoch printed this page yesterday f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)